Joe’s Jotter: Wholesome Summer Foddering for Students

 

Summer is a time for rest and reflection. As a student, do you ever think about your diet and the foods you eat? Do you go overboard on the junk food at times? Here are some pointers to read and have a think about as we approach mid-summer 2022. This article is not to lecture you, but rather to make you think about little adjustments you could make to ensure you are giving your body and mind the best possible chance as a new academic year approaches.

Target One or Two Improvements

Rather than aiming to overhaul your diet and what you eat, start by targeting one specific area for improvement before the new academic year kicks off. This should be something that is most relevant to you and is changeable, for example, breakfast. If you are someone who doesn’t eat a healthy breakfast, you could start by prioritising that. As you become more consistent with that meal, you can work on other mini targets, like eating more fruit and vegetables or reducing sugary drinks. It is important to be realistic about what you wish to achieve and give yourself a reasonable time period to achieve it.

Progress on any changes made should be judged over several weeks (rather than days), as new habits take time to form. Get a shopping list together and ask your parents to stock the fridge and freezer with specific whole foods. The more whole and natural a food is, the better. For example, a beetroot unpackaged and untouched is far better than a jar of sliced beetroot. You get the idea. If you can do a bit of cooking for yourself, you will never go hungry. Minor improvements to the quality of food you consume will help improve your concentration and focus going forward. Indeed, we all could do with that. More importantly for you, this will allow you to make a fast start for Term 1 in September.

You won’t go to far wrong by increasing your intake of fruit and vegetables for the remainder of the holidays. This will help you build up resistance to any bugs flying around come autumn time. Eating as many different coloured vegetables as you can is the secret to providing plenty of nutrients for your body. If you do opt for a takeaway (as is ok at times of course), cook some homemade vegetables to eat on the side. This balances the books a little and ensures you are still getting important vitamins and minerals.

Hydrate as Best You Can

Firstly, it’s important to know that your weight affects your fluid needs. You should drink 35ml of fluid daily for every kilogramme you weigh. For example, a 70kg (11 stone approx.) person should drink 2.45 litres per day. The recommended daily amount of water for a teenager is two litres, which works out at around at eight to ten glasses. The recommendation is to drink more than this if the day is particularly hot or if you are exercising. Research on athletes has shown that a two percent drop in hydration can lead to thirty percent drop in performance. This applies to any activity requiring a certain level of focus. It is also worth noting that a person’s body is made up of 50-60% water.

Water is the best form of hydration, and the benefits of water are well documented. Water increases energy, flushes out toxins, improves skin complexion, boosts the immune system, prevents cramps, balances the body’s fluids, promotes digestion, and eliminates waste products. Having all these benefits working in your favour is only going to help you maintain better health. Some low sugar fruit juices, like cranberry, blueberry and apple are also good for hydration and contain enzymes and vitamins. Fizzy drinks will also increase hydration, but again are to be avoided due to their high sugar content. Other foods to improve hydration include Cucumbers, Watermelon, Pineapple, Tomatoes, Blueberries, Pear, Lettuce, and Melon. Ultimately, sipping on water throughout the day is the best way to keep your body properly hydrated.

If you get dehydrated, your concentration for revision at home or performance on the sports field will be affected. Here are four tell-tale signs that your body is dehydrated and that you need to drink more fluids:

  • Dry mouth and skin: If you are dehydrated, you may not be producing enough saliva, which will lead to a build-up of bacteria in the mouth. Acne may also occur.
  • Food cravings: The body confuses thirst for hunger sometimes. Drinking water will reduce these cravings, as it is water your body often requires not food.
  • Headaches, tiredness, and confusion: A lack of water can lead to headaches during the day. This makes it very difficult to operate to your maximum capacity. Ask yourself the question, “Am I constantly tired?” If the answer is yes, you might just be lacking water in your diet. The process of learning and retaining information has been proven to be more difficult if your body lacks fluid.
  • Urine colour: The colour of urine should be light if you are well hydrated. The average hydrated person goes to the toilet to excrete urine six to eight times daily.

To combat dehydration, bring a bottle of water with you wherever you go. Keeping bottles of cold water in the fridge at home will make it easy to ‘grab and go’ and you can sip away on it as the day progresses. It is important to note that if you feel some of the above listed symptoms, your body may already be dehydrated. Prevention is better than cure in this case. Building good hydration into your everyday routine is a great habit to implement before Septembers’ resumption in school. Summertime presents an ideal opportunity to form this important habit. Joe

**Spend Time, Energy and Effort well over the next four weeks.**

More details about Joe’s Maths Tuition Classes for Junior Cycle and Leaving Certificate (2023) and his Award Winning ACE Maths Solution Books can be found via the links below.

ACE Maths Tuition Classes: acesolutionbooks.com/ace-maths-tuition

ACE Maths Solution Books: acesolutionbooks.com/buy-my-books

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Joe’s Jotter: Useful Vocabulary and Phrases for an Exam in Gaeilge

Hello students of Irish,

The key to excelling in languages is to learn a new word or phrase every single day and record it in a hardback (so my Irish teacher colleagues keep telling me). Here are some everyday phrases that can be used by students from Leaving Cert all the way down to First year. The great thing about knowing you vocab is that you can bring it into an essay, an appraisal of a poem or even an analysis of a piece of text; It works for everything. In my opinion, it is definitely an area worth investing your time into. Here is your list:

 

ag cabhrú le daoine bochta = helping poor people

I gcuinne mo thola = against my will

do thola – your will (singular)

a thola – his will

a tola – her will

ár dtola – our will

bhúr dtola- your will (pl.)

a dtola – their will

Is féidir leis rith ar nós na gaoithe.

de réir dealramh = apparently

de réir cosúileachta = apparently

níl ann ach ráiméis = it’s rubish

Tá sé ina chac! = It’s messed up!

Thar gach ní eile = above all else

Ní mór a admháil = it must be admitted

Is baolach = unfortunately

Dála an scéil = anyway..

Pé scéal é = anyway.

Ar an iomlán = on the whole

I gcomhthéacs an lae inniú = in the context of today’s world (handy for essays)

Ar amhraí an tsaoil = luckily

I ndeireadh na Dála = At the end of the day(NOT Ag deireadh an lae)

Idir an dá linn = in the meantime

Aithníonn ciaróg ciaróg eile = Takes one to know one

Tá sé de bhua ag an tír seo = this country has the advantage

Téann sé i bhfeidhm orthú = it affects them

Réitím leis an tuairim sin = I agree with that opinion

Níl de rogha air ach = there’s no alternative but

Go bunúsach = basically

Níl lá lochta agam orthu = I don’t blame them in the least

Ní gearánta dúinn = we shouldn’t complain

D’fhéadfaí a rá = one could say

Ní féidir a shéanadh = it cannot be denied

Tá róbhéim ar = There’s too great an emphasis on

Ní teorainn le = there’s no end to

Is léir don saol é = everybody knows

De réir na fianaise = according to the evidence

Is é fírinne an scéil = the truth is (in point of fact)

I gcian is i gcóngar = far & near

Níl aon dabht faoi = There’s no doubt about that

Aontáim go huile agus go homlán leis = I agree whole heartedly with it..

Ní gá ach sracfheachaint a thogail chun an fhírinne a fheiceail = It isn’t necessary but to take a glimpse to see the truth

Rinne mé an taighde agus tá an t-eolas agam chun an fhírinne a thaispeaint = I have done the research and I have the research to show the truth

Is léir go bhfuil/nach bhfuil = It’s clear that/that it isn’t..

Á mhalairt ar fad = far from it

Corp díchéile = the height of folly

Ina theannta sin = furthermore

Sa todhchaí = in the future

Bíodh sé lenár leas nó lenár n-aimhleas = let it be for good or for ill

Ní mór dúinn bheith san airdeall = we must be on out guard

Tuigim a thábhachtaí is atá sé = I understand its importance

Tá dul amú orthu sa mhéad seo = they are incorrect in this regard

Chuaigh sé i gcian ormsa = it influenced me

Go bhfios domsa = as far as I know

Is maith is eol dúinn = we know (only too) well

Ní lia duine ná tuairim = everybody has his own opinion

Tá clú agus cáil ar (Sheán) mar pheileadóir = (Seán) is very famous as a footballer

Mo áit dúchais = my native place

Tá sé ar dhuine de na cainteoirí is fearr = he is one of the best speakers

Cuireann sé le háilleacht na háite = it adds to the beauty of the place

Cuimhní taitneamhacha = pleasant memories

Dea-thréithe na ndaoine = the good charachteristics of the people

Bhí fonn taistil orm i gcónaí = I always wanted to travel

Is fada mé ag smaoineamh ar seo = I’ve long been thinking of this

Ó shin i leith = hence forth/from then on

Cleachtadh a dhéanann máistreacht = practice makes perfect

Ní lia tír ná nós = every country has it’s own customs

Nósanna na tíre = the cutoms of the country

Teastaíonn uaim é in a dhéanamh = I want to do that

Na háiteanna clúiteacha = the famous places

Is í mo thuairim mheáite = It’s my considered opinion

Rogha an dá dhíogha = The lesser of two evils

Tháinig an lá mór i ndeireadh na dála = the big day came at long last

Bhíomar go léir ar bior = we were all on edge

Bhí an áit plódaithe = the place was packed

An lucht féachána = the spectators

An lucht éisteachta = the audience

An lucht leanúna = the followers

Caighdeán ard = high standard

Chuir mé aithne air = I got to know him

Comórtas scoile = school competition

Daoine difriúla = different people

Féith an ghrinn = sense of humour

Bua na cainte = the gift of the gab

Ag pleidhcíocht = messing

Oibríonn sí go dian dícheallach = she works very hard

Bíonn aoibh mhaith air i gcónaí = he’s always in good form.

críochdheighilt = partition(as in political)

cinedheighilt = apartheid

comhrialtas = coalition government

reachtaíocht = legislation

poiblíocht = publicity

fuarchúis = apathy

Tá buntáistí agus míbhuntáistí ag baint leis – there are advantages and disadvantages connected with it

Thar a bheith tábhachtach = very important

Teagmháil leis an bpobal = contact with the people

Taithí = experience

Riachtanach = necessary

fite fuaite = interwoven

rinne mé staidéar orm féin = I steadied myself

chun an fhirinne a rá = to tell the truth

Tá mé as mo mheabhair = I’m crazy (lit. I’m out of my mind.)

Tá mé trí chéile = I’m in a (bad) state.

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More details about Joe’s ACE Maths Tuition classes for Junior Cycle and Leaving Certificate Students (2022), ACE Maths Assessments, and his Award winning ACE Maths Solution Books can be found via the links below.

W: acesolutionbooks.com/ace-maths-tuition
FB: facebook.com/JoeMcCormackEducationalExpert/

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